NEW VIDEO: David Wood & the OT Prophecies About Jesus

With Episode II, a series of refutations of David Wood’s lies about Jesus (peace be upon him) begins. First in line, the alleged “dozens” of Old Testament “prophecies” that Jesus supposedly “fulfilled”…

Prepare yourselves, young padawans. The shroud of the Dark Side has fallen. Begun the Jesus War has.

10 thoughts on “NEW VIDEO: David Wood & the OT Prophecies About Jesus

  1. quote:
    Most Biblical scholars (secular and liberal religious ones) now actually understand this to have happened the other way around: that the predictions of the imminence of the eschaton were the earlier ones, and then later the “only God knows”-type apologetics popped up. (Jesus’ quote in Matthew 10:23 is one of the best examples of an early “this is happening imminently.”)

    It’s not nearly as well-known of a verse, but you can kind of see the development of this process in action, toward the end of the gospel of John. Someone asks Jesus what sort of fate will befall his closest disciple; and Jesus actually responds that the disciple will remain alive until the second coming (in contrast to Peter, etc.). But then it looks like the editor of the gospel scrambled to immediately offer a pretty outlandish reinterpretation of Jesus’ response: https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John%2021:20-23&version=NRSV

    https://old.reddit.com/r/Qult_Headquarters/comments/njzfew/hilarious_prediction_from_01182021/gzbe05c/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mr.heathcliff

      “heaven and earth will pass away but my words will not ”
      another false claim

      the gospel writers DE-ACOPOLYSE jesus’ words when he failed to return. what did jesus say?

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      1. mr.heathcliff

        powerful evidence that “some standing here will not taste death” was not referring to transfiguration:

        Which is to be expected since Matthew and Luke are both redactional of Mark’s narrative. Kent Brower (JSNT, 1980) wrote that “few scholars, if any, consider the con­nection between the logion of 9:1 and the pericope of 9:2-10 to be the original context”, but rather devised by the author of Mark and repeated by those following him. Mark connected the two pericopes (8:34-9:1 and 9:2-10) because the latter event reveals Jesus in the glory that he would have as the Lord who judges the living and dead as the coming Son of Man. But the link is a tenuous one. The very solemn expression (ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν) contrasts sharply with the brief time interval, with it being hardly surprising that a few (τινες) of his disciples would still be alive in just six days. The solemnity rather pertains to the preceding discussion about persecution (8:34-36), with “tasting death” referring to the trials that Jesus’ disciples would face prior to the coming of the Son of Man (as in 13:9-13) with the promise that some will survive to the end (as in 13:20, 30). The trials that the disciples would face would not occur in the span of those six days but in the course of their lives prior to the parousia. Rather 8:38 and 9:1 refer to the same thing and anticipate the language in 13:26-27 and 14:62 (which concern the parousia, cf. also Revelation 1:7):

        8:38: ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου / ἔρχομαι / ἐν + δόξῃ / μετὰ + ἀγγέλων

        9:1: ὁράω / βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ / ἔρχομαι / ἐν + δυνάμει

        13:26-27: ὁράω / ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου / ἔρχομαι / μετὰ + δυνάμει and δόξῃ / ἀποστελεῖ τοὺς ἀγγέλους

        14:62: ὁράω / ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου / ἐκ + δεξιῶν δυνάμεως / ἔρχομαι

        There is also a strong judicial component in 8:38 (with ἐπαισχύνομαι potentially allusive of αἰσχύνην in Daniel 12:2 referring to eschatological judgment of the wicked in the general resurrection), which is intensified in the Matthean redaction. This is relevant to Judgment Day and not the transfiguration which does not involve the judging of the current generation (see also Mark 9:47, 10:23 on the judging of one’s deeds in terms of entering the kingdom of God versus Gehenna), nor is the kingdom’s establishment mentioned in the transfiguration story. The saying tradition in 8:38-9:1, regardless of its redactional placement in the narrative, looks ahead to the parousia later discussed in Mark 13.

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      2. mr.heathcliff

        The solemnity rather pertains to the preceding discussion about persecution (8:34-36), with “tasting death” referring to the trials that Jesus’ disciples would face prior to the coming of the Son of Man (as in 13:9-13) with the promise that some will survive to the end (as in 13:20, 30). The trials that the disciples would face would not occur in the span of those six days but in the course of their lives prior to the parousia. Rather 8:38 and 9:1 refer to the same thing and anticipate the language in 13:26-27 and 14:62 (which concern the parousia, cf. also Revelation 1:7):

        ///

        Luke 21:27-28: “At that time they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. When these things begin to take place, stand up and lift up your heads, because your redemption draws near.”

        ///
        quote:

        In what sense was their redemption drawing near in 70 CE when the temple was being destroyed? To the contrary, it appears that the “drawing near” language is meant to depict the disciples looking up and seeing their Lord coming in their direction. EDIT: At the very least, we can say that Jesus’ coming is meant to bring imminent redemption for the disciples, which is not the case if this is simply a coronation ceremony for the Son of man.

        quote:
        Perhaps you interpret “those days” loosely and think Jesus was speaking from God’s timescale. But this would be special pleading since Jesus uses “those days” several times in this chapter and it’s clear that he is speaking to the first century struggle between the Jews and Romans.

        It’s also described as the greatest tribulation there has ever been or ever will be. It’s hard to imagine that the flight from the city and the emergence of false prophets can be called the “greatest tribulation there will ever be.” Certainly not greater than the destruction itself.

        “There will be great distress in the land and wrath against this people. And they will fall by the sword and will be taken as prisoners to all the nations.”
        This is a clear depiction of the city’s destruction.

        Jesus says this about the tribulation: “There will be great distress in the land and wrath against this people. And they will fall by the sword and will be taken as prisoners to all the nations.” This is a clear depiction of the city’s destruction.

        Now what are we told about this final judgment?
        * Vv 37-39: It will be as the days of Noah – people were eating, drinking, marrying until the flood came and destroyed them all.
        * Vv 40-41: Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left. Two women will be grinding with a hand mill; one will be taken and the other left.

        Now where else is this exact event described? In Luke 17, Jesus says this about his coming:
        * Vv 26-27: It will be as the days of Noah – people were eating, drinking, marrying until the flood came and destroyed them all.
        * Vv 34-35: Two men will be in one bed; one will be taken and the other left. Two women will be grinding grain together; one will be taken and the other left.

        Now I suppose it’s possible Jesus is using the exact same language to describe two different events here. But this is unlikely, especially since both are described as a normal unexceptional day (“eating, drinking, and marrying”).

        quote:
        In Matt 24-25, Jesus describes “the coming of the Son of man” using 4 parables: The thief comes to break into a house. The master comes back to his servants after leaving them. The bridegroom comes to meet the virgins. The master comes back to settle his accounts with his servants. In each of these parables, the direction of coming is to the earth.
        Luke 18:8: “When the Son of man comes, will he find faith on the earth?” Given that the context of this passage is God avenging his elect from their oppressors, this appears to be a reference to the second coming.
        Luke 21:27-28: “At that time they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. When these things begin to take place, stand up and lift up your heads, because your redemption draws near.” In what sense was their redemption drawing near in 70 CE when the temple was being destroyed? To the contrary, it appears that the “drawing near” language is meant to depict the disciples looking up and seeing their Lord coming in their direction.
        Acts 1:11: “Men of Galilee, why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven.” The direction that Jesus comes is back to Earth.
        In 2 Thess 1:7, Paul describes it as a day when “the Lord Jesus is revealed from heaven in blazing fire with his powerful angels, punishing those who do not know God.”

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  2. mr.heathcliff

    quote:
    In Matt 24-25, Jesus describes “the coming of the Son of man” using 4 parables: The thief comes to break into a house. The master comes back to his servants after leaving them. The bridegroom comes to meet the virgins. The master comes back to settle his accounts with his servants. In each of these parables, the direction of coming is to the earth.
    Luke 21:27-28: “At that time they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. When these things begin to take place, stand up and lift up your heads, because your redemption draws near.” In what sense was their redemption drawing near in 70 CE when the temple was being destroyed? To the contrary, it appears that the “drawing near” language is meant to depict the disciples looking up and seeing their Lord coming in their direction. EDIT: At the very least, we can say that Jesus’ coming is meant to bring imminent redemption for the disciples, which is not the case if this is simply a coronation ceremony for the Son of man.

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  3. mr.heathcliff

    QUOTE:
    But there are other eschatological statements throughout the discourse, too. I’d already mentioned 10:7; and 10:14–15 also puts it in a clear eschatological context, talking about the retribution that was to come against the non-welcoming places they visited. To me, 10:14–15 together create an essential causal link between the apostolic ministry and the final judgment — that the eschatological fate of these cities/towns was actually conditional upon their response to the apostles.

    10:23 is also prefaced by the previous verse, which seems to serve as a sort of connector, linking the apostles’ itinerant ministry to the persecutions (which they’re to hopefully “endure to the end”).

    Although one crucial thing to mention here — and I vaguely hinted toward this in my original reply — is that many scholars do believe that the discourse in Matthew 10 has been supplemented by material that already reflects later historical realities.

    Though I suppose we could say the same thing about other Son of Man sayings. The similar “Son of Man coming” saying in Mark 8:38 occurs in a context of Jesus both intimating his own death, as well as the persecution of his followers. Luke 17:26-27 is similar, following a prediction of Jesus’ death. Luke 18:7-8 is a bit more generalized.

    All of that being said, I think it was Albert Schweitzer who (in)famously took Matthew 10:23 to imply that Jesus actually hadn’t originally expected his own death, and thought that the eschaton would take place prior to this.

    ////

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